Posts Tagged ‘apple’

This past Wednesday Apple had a keynote event announcing the iPad 2. Steve Jobs demonstrated the refined new iPad in a highly polished presentation while simultaneously slipping in a few jabs at Apple’s competitors. Overall it was a pretty standard affair for an Apple event.

As I listened to Steve speak, one phrase kept gnawing at me. Steve said that the iPad was “a post-pc device”. As an iOS developer who makes his living building apps for iPads and iPhones, I disagree. You see iOS has this ball and chain attached to it called “iTunes” that runs on a typical PC. The first time you turn your iPad on you’re greeted with this screen on the right prompting you to plug your iPad into a computer so it can be setup. You can’t even turn your iPad on the first time without being tethered to iTunes.

Do you want to get media on your device (other than from the iTunes store)? Better have a computer handy so you can sync with iTunes. If you’re traveling and must preform a hard reset (where you lose all of your data) what do you do? You won’t have any way to get your data back until you get home and can sync your latest backup from iTunes. As someone who no longer travels with a laptop (just an iPad), this thought terrifies me.

For a device that is “a post-pc device”, it sure feels like a peripheral product to a typical computer.

I love my iPad and my iPhone but to call them post-pc devices is pure ideology at this stage in the game, and not grounded in reality. With Apple’s massive data center rumored to go live anytime, they could alleviate a lot of these problems by letting some of your data reside in the cloud. Until then as an iOS developer, I believe calling the iPad a “post-pc” device is disingenuous.

Well said! Honestly, until that day comes when Tablets allow seamless editing of spreadsheets and presentations, the Tablet will simply be an additional device and not a replacement for the PC/Laptop.

If Apple made Water

Posted: February 16, 2011 in Uncategorized
Tags: , ,

The company will also announce that it has raised $800,000 in venture capital, the first step in moving along the path from building an app to running a profitable business.

The New York Times on Pulse growing and making the app free

I’m happy for the Pulse team. Pulse is great. But this quote, for which the blame lies more on this article’s author, is (probably unintentionally) ridiculous. Unfortunately, the media loves zeros and gets carried away by any announcement that involves a big figure.

Hundreds (if not thousands) of iPhone and iPad apps are made by profitable businesses that didn’t raise any venture capital. In fact, making the app free is going to remove its biggest revenue stream, which is likely to be generating at least $25,000 per month.

I’m sure the Pulse team put a lot of thought into this and have a good chance of making money later in other ways, as the article mentions. But in the short term, this move is likely to make them quite unprofitable. That’s why businesses raise venture capital: to cover their costs when they’re unprofitable so they can grow into something that’s hopefully larger and very profitable later.

It’s ridiculous, incorrect, and insulting to those who have chosen the traditional business model — charge money, spend less than you make — for this author to suggest that giving away your product for free and paying your expenses with VC money is the “first step” to make your app development “a profitable business”.

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Google TV Remote vs. Apple TV Remote

Posted: December 16, 2010 in Uncategorized
Tags: ,


Which one looks more user friendly?